The Orphaned Images Project: Allen, Sturm and Cross families

I bought this “orphaned image“ from a vendor at the Nashville Flea Market in late September. I recall him saying the photos were from somewhere midwest—Indiana, I believe. The photo is labeled on the back as such:

L. to R. Tom Allen, William “Bill” Allen, Lou Cagle Allen, Abbie Allen holding Carol Sturm, Bob Sturm holding Bobbie Sturm, Darrel Ray Allen, Florence Cross.

Children in front: Donna & Barbara Allen, Laury and Florence Louise Cross. Far right: Aunt Florence, Florence Louise and Laury Cross.

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The Orphaned Images Project: Brown, North Platte, Nebr.

I’m assuming this is also a Lucky Dedmore photograph. The photo was labeled “Brown, North Platte, Nebr.” Perhaps it’s the Brown family? If so, where is Mrs. Brown? There appear to be eight children—five daughters and three sons, but no one old enough to look like a mother figure. Wonder what the story is behind this portrait?

SMALL Brown North Platte HiRez

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1931, Dedmore, North Platte, Nebr.

SMALL 1931 Dedmore North Platte Nebr

With just a little bit of research, I’ve discovered that Dedmore is the name of the photographer for this photograph. This is one of many portraits I bought in a batch from someone on eBay some time ago.

Clinton Orla “Lucky” Dedmore was born in Fairmont, Nebraska in 1881, where he spent most of his life. His parents were born in Iowa where they lived until their children were grown, then moved to Nebraska where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father served in the Civil War and died in North Platte at the age of 89. Clinton Dedmore opened his studio in April 1919 and remained in business until 1949. He died in 1956.

On http://www.northplattebulletin.com, I discovered an article by Kaycee Anderson about the historic Dixon Building, located at 514-518 N. Dewey in North Platte, Nebraska.

In 1934 Lucky Dedmore moved a photo studio into the second floor of the building. The owner, Harry Dixon, allowed Dedmore to put a skylight into the second floor hallway so there would be “available light” for Dedmore’s studio on the second floor, according to archived newspaper reports. The skylight that Dedmore installed is still there.

He was listed in the Who’s Who in Nebraska with this excerpt: DEDMORE, C O: Photographer; b Fairmont, Neb Nov 13, 1888; s of Elias D Dedmore-Phoebe Merrell; ed Fairmont; m Ida Hodges July 15, 1912 Joliet Ill; 1908-17 street car opr Joliet Ill; opr studio while emp by street car co; comml photog Joliet Ill, opr studio in Deming N M; 1919- owner & mgr Dedmore Studio, North Platte; mbr vol fire dept; Pioneer Ad Club, dir; MWA; Lincoln County Wildlife Club; North Platte Garden Club; Rep; hobbies, fancy woodwork, fishing, hunting; off 516 Dewey; res 221 S Oak, North Platte.

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The Orphaned Images Project: Isn’t she lovely?

From the “Texas box” of orphaned images…

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The Orphaned Images Project: Family portrait

Another photo from the “Texas box,” no details on back as to family names or photographer. Check out the hair style on the young man in the upper left corner!

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The Orphaned Images Project: Family portrait by Ruf & Dilger

After a major studio/office spring cleaning, I’m back to scanning more photos from my huge orphaned images collection! I’ve also attached a shot of the back of the photo. This photo came from a box of mostly Texas/Fredericksburg-related images.

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The (not so) Orphaned Images Project: Aunt Lorene

My dad just shared this striking photo with me. It was posted by a family member on Facebook recently. This lovely model is my Aunt Lorene, one of his three older sisters. She was the last to pass away of his siblings (Larry, Jesse and Dot preceded her in death). In her teen years, she worked in a garment factory. Here, she modeled for a photographer in Eupora, Mississippi. I always thought she was pretty (she had robin’s egg blue eyes with flecks of gold), but hadn’t seen photos of her as a young woman until a few years ago. No wonder she inspired that photographer!

Aunt Lorene

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The Orphaned Images Project: Petticoat Junction, anyone?

Scribbled in pencil on the back of this photo:

Luella Devo and me, Jesse and Adelaide Devoe on the silo

With just a few seconds of research, beginning with the fact that two of the women in this photo are likely sisters—Adelaide and Luella—I found a grave marker that indicates Adelaide Delphine DeVoe was born October 15, 1890 and died May 3, 1984. Her younger sister, Luella Adella DeVoe, was born two years later on October 24, 1892 and died April 15, 1957. They are buried in the Parfreyville Cemetery, Section 12, Dayton Township, Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

Adelaide was 93 when she passed away at Bethany Home. She lived in Waupaca for 60 years and worked for 30 years in the laundry at the Wisconsin Veteran’s Home (WVH). She had two brothers, Claude and Floyd. I can’t find any indication that she or her sister ever married or had a family.

There is very little information on the link for Luella’s gravestone. I did learn that in 1941 she was the “head laundress” of the WVH-King Laundry. Ed Fosgate was the head laundry man and there were a total of 12 employees in the Laundry. They handled 7,567 pounds per week with 3,300 of this being sheets. There were 641 members.

I did find their father, Charles DeVoe. He was born in Rennessalier County, NY on June 26, 1855. When he was six, he moved with his parents to Fond Du Lac, WI. In 1890 he married Amanda Chapel. They had seven children (one died in infancy). They moved to Janesville and then to Oshkosh.

From the Waushara County Obituaries: Left to mourn his loss are his wife, four sons, Harley, Floyd, Claude and Floyd, and two daughters, Adelade and Luella, all of Oshkosh, and two brothers, Henry and Willard of Etna, Washington. He died July 29, 1922, at the age of 67 years, 1 month and 3 days at the home of his niece, Mr. Ora Wing. He was sick only a few hours.

Research is fun even if these aren’t my family members! It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle, made easier by someone’s cursive writing on the back of an old photo.

Double-click on the photo to see more detail. Learn more about The Orphaned Images Project on my site dedicated to this project here.

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The Orphaned Images Project: Class Picture Day

I realize that these young students were probably told to remain motionless while their class photo was taken, but there is not one happy face in the bunch, is there? The writing at the bottom of the photo reads “Estella” (with an arrow pointing to the young girl that is seated fifth from the left), below that reads “Gobbelsville, Indiana.” The name “Berlia” is written with an arrow pointed to the child seated second from right. Berlia sounds like a girl’s name, but girls didn’t wear pants back in those days.

I did a search for “Gobbelsville” and there aren’t any results on Google. There is a town by the name of “Gobelsville,” though—an unincorporated town in Clear Creek Township, Huntington County, Indiana.

Double-click on the photo to see more detail.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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The (Not so) Orphaned Images Project: Grandma Hester’s prayer

I found this handwritten prayer, in my (paternal) grandmother’s handwriting, in a box of old family photos (that obviously are not orphaned). She wrote it on four sheets of her husband’s business invoices. John F. Weathers was a carpenter and my father’s stepfather. They were living in Midland, Texas at the time and it was in the early 1950s. No matter your religious affiliation (or lack thereof), or to whom you send your verbal (or silent) prayers out to, I thought it had enough merit to share with my viewers.

An Anonymous Prayer (Written in the 17th century)

Lord, thy knowest better than I know myself
that I am growing older and will someday be old.
Keep me from the fatal habit of thinking I must say something
on every subject and, on every occasion.

Release me from craving to straighten out everybody’s affairs.
Make me thoughtful but not moody, helpful but not bossy,
With my vast store of wisdom it seems a pity not to use it all.
But, Thou knowest Lord that I want a few friends at the end.

Keep my mind from the recitals of endless details.
Give me wings to get to the point.
Seal my lips on my aches and pains.
They are increasing and love of rehearsing them
is becoming sweeter as the time goes by.

I do not ask for Grace enough to enjoy the tales
of other’s pain but, help me endure them with patience.
I dare not ask for improved memory, but for a
growing humility and a lessening cocksureness
when my memory seems to clash with the memories of others.
Teach me the glorious lesson that occasionally I may be mistaken.

Keep me reasonably sweet I do not want to be a Saint.
Some of them are so hard to live with.
But a sour person is the works of the Devil.
Give me the ability to see good things in
unexpected places and talents in unexpected people.
And, give me, O Lord, the Grace to tell them so!

 

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